sewing classes in Chicago: tchad: papercut patterns: saiph tunic: erin

Papercut Patterns “Saiph Tunic”

We’ve been lucky as sewers the past few years that there are so many smaller pattern companies popping up and putting out great stuff!

No more taping things together with A4 paper unless you are really, really into it!

Recently we had Papercut Patterns “Saiph Tunic” show up on the workroom tables and we have a few comments… Let’s get it done.

First of all, this packaging and marketing is absolutely beautiful.

sewing classes in Chicago: tchad: papercut patterns: saiph tunic: erin
Saiph Tunic, by Papercut Patterns.

For around US$15 you get a flat pattern box (not just an envelope) with the logo cut out and some of the sturdiest paper patterns we’ve seen that weren’t self-drafted.  This is a real delight.  They say they “aim to use recycled materials where possible” and it would be interesting to look into that more, but still – so far so good considering that the big-4 companies can’t get it together to print a pattern less than $15 US that lasts more than two pinnings.  This is actually something that will give you multiple hard pinnings and definitely scores and scores of tracings.

The instructions were clear and straightforward.  It will be interesting to see what some of the other patterns from the company that get used up here are like.  This tunic was absolutely fine for a beginner-intermediate sewer.

Erin worked it up in a medium-lightweight seersucker with white cotton bias binding.  The back closure is a simple button and bias-loop.  Here is her final result:

Papercut: saiph tunic: sewing classes in Chicago: Tchad: studio: workroom: New Zealand: Erin: seersucker: unbelted
3/4 Unbelted

 

Papercut: saiph tunic: sewing classes in Chicago: Tchad: studio: workroom: New Zealand: Erin: seersucker: unbelted
Back Unbelted

 

Papercut: saiph tunic: sewing classes in Chicago: Tchad: studio: workroom: New Zealand: Erin: seersucker: unbelted
Front, belted

 

Papercut: saiph tunic: sewing classes in Chicago: Tchad: studio: workroom: New Zealand: Erin: seersucker: belted
Belted

 

Papercut: saiph tunic: sewing classes in Chicago: Tchad: studio: workroom: New Zealand: Erin: seersucker: belted
Ta-Da!

Erin’s tastes in patterns generally tend to run to a kind of 1960’s A-line like this project, so the belted look was more both to her taste as well as more flattering in general. If it helps other sewers gauge the look and size, Erin is generally just on the smaller side of a Standard pattern size 12 – with a smaller than average waist.

Some notes about this particular pattern:

• It is SHORT.  Erin is only like 5’5″ and doesn’t mind things being short, but she added 2″ to the length in this finished version. She added it to the bottom of the bodice itself so that the proportion of the ruffle/flounce wasn’t thrown off. It would have to be worn with tights most of the time if she hadn’t added the extra length.
• If you are going to make this to be worn without a belt, most women will find it more flattering to make it out of a fabric that has a little more slink and drape to it.  This would be amazing in any number of fabrics – challis, faille, charmeuse, all kinds of lightweight cottons, linens, and light crepes.  The heavier the fabric, the more it is going to stand away from the body.  The blue fabric they use in the online catalogue looks like a nice silk or perhaps a rayon.  We are in the mood to tell everyone to make everything out of silk faille lately, so that goes for this, too.
• If you are making this, think about the balance between fit and drape.  If you over-fit these tunics or sack dresses, you are going to struggle to get into them or need a zipper.  They start to lose their shape and style if you aren’t careful.
• As Erin worked through the instructions for the back closure, they could have been a little clearer.  The way they have you finish the back of the neckline needs just a little bit of adjustment to the sequence if you want it to be perfect.  It is absolutely fine/acceptable as it is, but it could be better if they would re-sequence it.  We’ll get her back up here to go through the finer points of it in a few days.

Overall, just a delightfully simple pattern that just about anybody can follow directly right out of the box and most bare-bones beginners could get their heads around without too much trouble.  They’ve got a good Instagram and online presence too, so you can tell this whole operation is run by folks who both know what they are doing and really care about their product as they sell it.

Just a great experience.

You can buy the Saiph Tunic here.

You can read about the Saiph Tunic on Pattern Review here.

 

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